Cyber Security Institute

Thursday, December 30, 2004

Phishing, spyware and other pests plagued 2004

Rogue programs known as “spyware” hijacked Web browsers and crippled computers.
Computer worms raced around the world, leaving behind tools that spread spam. Scammers sent e-mail to trick bank account holders into revealing passwords. Rogue programs known as “spyware” hijacked Web browsers and crippled computers.  These were among the top Internet threats of 2004 as the perpetrators grew smarter and more sophisticated, driven more than ever by economic gains.

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Cyber crime booms in 2004

The last 12 months have seen a dramatic growth in almost every security threat that plague Windows PCs.

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Wednesday, December 22, 2004

Groups fight Internet wiretap push

Companies and advocacy groups opposed to the FBI’s plan to make the Internet more accommodating to covert law enforcement surveillance are sharpening a new argument against the controversial proposal: that law enforcement’s Internet spying capabilities are just fine as it is.

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EMC Raises Bar on Network Management

EMC’s bid to acquire Smarts Inc. for $260 million made it the latest systems vendor to add management software that helps customers gain greater visibility into their IT environments.

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EU and U.S. Diverge on Antitrust Law

Global companies may have to apply local rules to their business practices in light of European court ruling that upheld antitrust penalties against Microsoft (Quote, Chart), attorneys said.

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How ITIL Can Improve Information Security

ITIL - the Information Technology Infrastructure Library - is a set of best practices and guidelines that define an integrated, process-based approach for managing information technology services.  This article will provide a general overview of ITIL and discuss how ITIL can improve how organizations implement and manage information security.

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Monday, December 20, 2004

What’s Ahead For Identity Management in 2005

Research says that new challenges such as the rising threats of fraud and identity theft are causing a fundamental shift in the identity management market.  In 2005, as in 2004, compliance will be the primary driver for enterprise investment in identity management.

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Microsoft Alters Hotmail Security Trend

Security software firm Trend Micro (Quote, Chart) announced it had completed a deal with Microsoft (Quote, Chart) to provide virus scanning, protection and cleaning for its Hotmail Web-based e-mail service.

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Cisco reveals security blunder

Cisco Systems has warned customers of vulnerabilities in its communications software package and of a security tool that can be used by attackers to gain access to networks.

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Cisco to buy security start-up

The company announced plans to buy privately held Protego Networks, which makes software that aggregates and correlates information about security threats, for $65 million in cash.

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Saturday, December 18, 2004

SAP Introduces Security Service

SAP announced that it will begin offering customers a new security service aimed at tightening down their existing SAP systems.

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Friday, December 17, 2004

Survivor’s Guide to 2005: Security

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DHS Audit Unearths Security Weaknesses

An audit of the Department of Homeland Security’s system controls for remote access has found an alarming absence of configuration guidelines and several unpatched software products that put the DHS at risk of malicious hacker attacks.

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Yankee Group Sees Open-Source Indemnification Nightmare

According to a recent report by The Yankee Group, indemnification is becoming open source’s nightmare and Microsoft’s blessing.  However, other analysts and open-source companies don’t see it that way.

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Microsoft snaps up anti-spyware firm

Microsoft announced that it has acquired Giant Company Software, a privately owned provider of anti-spyware, anti-pop-up and anti-spam tools.

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US GPS policy to be closely coordinated

The first GPS policy update in eight years strongly reaffirms the U.S. commitment to GPS technology, a positive signal for companies that develop, market and export related products for commercial, scientific and military uses.

The United States will begin an aggressive promotion and tighter coordination oversight of its Global Positioning System.

The first GPS policy update in eight years strongly reaffirms the U.S. commitment to GPS technology, a positive signal for companies that develop, market and export related products for commercial, scientific and military uses.

A central priority of the new blueprint is to ensure, at minimum, a certain level of harmony between GPS and other space-based systems to guarantee ease of use and precision wherever the technology exists.  It also formalizes the U.S. response to developing global realities, including Europe’s recent decision to move forward with a system similar to GPS called Galileo,

Another priority is to ensure that no military or other threat can exploit global positioning technology to disrupt battlefield operations or launch an attack on U.S. interests at home or abroad.

http://www.xatrix.org/article3702.html

Thursday, December 16, 2004

Microsoft may charge extra for security software

Microsoft Corp. disclosed plans to offer frustrated users of its Windows software new tools within 30 days to remove spyware programs secretly running on computers.

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Nessus no longer free

Vendors relying on open-source Nessus won’t automatically get free, timely “plugin” programs after project managers of the popular vulnerability scanner announced a new feed structure that provides the most recent releases for a fee.

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Symantec will buy Veritas for $13.5B in stock

Symantec will buy Veritas Software in an all-stock transaction, the companies announced Thursday.

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Wednesday, December 15, 2004

Survivor’s Guide to 2005: Security

Security has become so critical to enterprise networking that it’s developing along several different lines simultaneously.

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NSA to take lead on Defense info assurance architecture

The National Security Agency is filling a new role in the Defense Department: leading the information assurance path DOD takes to becoming a network-centric workplace.

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Sunday, December 12, 2004

Security research suggests Linux has fewer flaws

The Linux operating system has many times fewer bugs than typical commercial software, according to an upcoming report.

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Friday, December 10, 2004

Government Looking To Improve Security Through 3-D Biometrics

A4Vision and Unisys are working to develop pilot programs for 3-D facial imaging and recognition worldwide.

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Thursday, December 09, 2004

Phishing Web sites grew by 33% in November

The number of phishing Web sites associated with online identity theft scams grew by 33% in November, after dropping off in September and early October, according to data compiled by the Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG) and shared with IDG News Service.

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Chinese cybercops ‘nailing virus writers’

European police aren’t good enough at fighting virtual crime and should learn from China, says Kaspersky Labs

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Tuesday, December 07, 2004

Asia Pacific: Combat cyber crime, firms told

THE government and private sector should work hand-in-hand to combat crime which is becoming more sophisticated, said state police chief DCP Datuk Othman Talib.

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Linux server market to be ‘worth $9bn by 2008’

Sales of servers using Linux will grow faster than the overall market at least through 2008, when customers will spend $9.1bn for machines using the open-source operating system, market researcher IDC forecast Monday.

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Trend Micro Extends Anti-Virus Software to Mobile Market

Trend Micro announced that they are extending their anti-virus product line into the mobile and portable space with the launch of Trend Micro Mobile Security.

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Show Time for Security

Sure, image isn’t everything. But in security, projecting the right image helps get the job done.  The article’s idea is to explore the role of appearances in security and determine how the profession needs to make itself over in order to get its message heard.

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Monday, December 06, 2004

Antispam campaign bites the dust

After a week of heavy criticism, Lycos Europe said on Friday that it has thrown in the towel on its plan to launch denial-of-service-like attacks on spammers.

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