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Friday, May 03, 2013

Dutch bill seeks to give law enforcement hacking powers

The Dutch government today presented a draft bill that aims to give law enforcement the power to hack into computer systems—including those located in foreign countires—to do research, gather and copy evidence or block access to certain data. Law enforcement should be allowed to block access to child pornography, read emails that contain information exchanged between criminals and also be able to place taps on communication, according to a draft bill published Thursday and signed by Ivo Opstelten, the Minister of Security and Justice.   Government agents should also be able to engage in activities such as turning on a suspect’s phone GPS to track their location, the bill said. Another problem is tackling distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks that recently have been used to cripple the online services of Dutch banks and DigiD, an identity management platform used by Dutch government agencies.

 

To disable a botnet it is necessary to access the command and control servers that control the botnet which can be located in a foreign country, according to the bill. The new investigative powers would also allow law enforcement to infiltrate computers or servers located in foreign countries if the location of those computers cannot be determined.


“It is important that the government wants to combat cybercrime but this proposal is rushed: it is unnecessary and creates new security risks for citizens,” said Simone Halink of Dutch digital rights organization Bits of Freedom in a blog post on Thursday.


At the moment the draft bill is in the consultation phase, meaning parties involved such as the police and other law enforcement as well as citizens and advisory bodies will be able to comment on it, ministry spokesman Wiebe AlkemaA said. Following that, the bill will be sent to sent to the Council of Ministers after which it will be sent to the Dutch Council of State, an advisory body on legislation.


Link: http://m.networkworld.com/news/2013/050213-dutch-bill-seeks-to-give-269341.html?mm_ref=http%3A%2F%2Fhackerattacks.einnews.com%2Farticle%2F148868025%2FMqlS6swIW71VD0gY%3Fn%3D2

 

Posted on 05/03
RegulationsPermalink