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Thursday, April 25, 2013

Recently patched Java flaw already targeted in mass attacks

The vulnerability, identified as CVE-2013-2423, was one of the 42 security issues fixed in Java 7 Update 21 that was released by Oracle last week, on April 16. The company gave the flaw’s impact a 4.3 out of 10 rating using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) and added that “this vulnerability can be exploited only through untrusted Java Web Start applications and untrusted Java applets.”


The vulnerability, identified as CVE-2013-2423, was one of the 42 security issues fixed in Java 7 Update 21 that was released by Oracle last week, on April 16. The company gave the flaw’s impact a 4.3 out of 10 rating using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) and added that “this vulnerability can be exploited only through untrusted Java Web Start applications and untrusted Java applets.”

An exploit for CVE-2013-2423 was integrated into a high-end Web attack toolkit known as Cool Exploit Kit and is used to install a piece of malware called Reveton, an independent malware researcher known online as Kafeine said Tuesday in a blog post.


The vulnerability started being targeted by attackers one day after an exploit for the same flaw was added to the Metasploit framework, an open-source tool commonly used by penetration testers, the F-Secure researchers said.


This wouldn’t be the first time when cybercriminals have taken Metasploit exploit modules and adapted them for use with their own malicious attack toolkits.


Users who need Java on their computers and especially in their browsers are advised to upgrade their Java installations to the latest available version—Java 7 Update 21—as soon as possible. This version also made changes to the security warnings displayed when websites attempt to load Web-based Java applications in order to better represent the risk associated with allowing different types of applets to execute.


Browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox also have a feature known as click-to-play that can be used to block plug-in-based content from executing without explicit consent.


Link: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9238652/Recently_patched_Java_flaw_already_targeted_in_mass_attacks?source=CTWNLE_nlt_pm_2013-04-24

 

Posted on 04/25
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